Forest Stewardship Program

Overview

The purpose of the Forest Stewardship Program is to:

Assist private forest landowners to more actively manage their forest and related resources; to keep these lands in a productive and healthy condition for present and future owners; and to increase the economic and environmental benefits of these lands.

The New Mexico Forest Stewardship Program provides technical assistance to landowners and land managers interested in achieving multiple benefits from their land. The program also recognizes landowners who apply good stewardship practices on their forested land.

The Forest Stewardship Program is managed in concert with the United States Forest Service (USFS) State and Private Cooperative Forestry Program. State Forestry agencies across the country receive funding from the USFS to provide the program in their state. Each state has been asked to conduct a spatial analysis project (SAP) using a geographic information system (GIS) and standard layers and protocols in order to provide Stewardship in high priority areas. The NM SAP was completed in the spring of 2007 under contract with the University of New Mexico's Earth Data Analysis Center (EDAC). The outcome of high priority areas were not surprising to State Forestry staff - they are areas where we were already working with landowners.

 

HERE'S HOW YOU BENEFIT


In New Mexico, the Forest Stewardship and Stewardship Incentives Program help you become a better manager of your forested property or land suitable for growing trees. Good stewardship will provide diversified wildlife habitats, family recreation, improved soil and water quality, as well as ensuring adequate timber supplies and maintaining options for the future.

Stewardship plan was written for the City of Las Vegas, NM to manage resources around their reservoirs.  This is Bradley Reservoir

WHO'S ELIGIBLE?

You are eligible if you own a minimum of 10 acres but not more than 1,000 acres of forested land. Non-forested land suitable for growing trees may also qualify. Waivers may be granted for exceptions up to 5,000 acres.

  • A forest stewardship plan must be developed by a resource professional and approved by the State Forester. Stewardship practices must be maintained for 10 years.
  • The management plan will address landowner objectives, fish and wildlife, threatened and endangered species, soil, water, wetlands, recreation, aesthetics, cultural resources and timber resources for the property. Forest stewardship and management plan outlines and landowner templates are available in PDF format.
  • You can take the first step by contacting one of the State Forestry's District offices, by phone or mail, or email to: nm.forestry@nmforestry.com.

To meet the state's stewardship goals, a New Mexico Forest Stewardship Coordinating Committee has been formed. The Committee addresses stewardship planning, implementation concerns and overall program coordination. Members of the Committee are: NM Forestry Division, USDA Forest Service, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, USDA consolidated Farm Services Agency, NM Cooperative Extension Service, NM Soil and Water Conservation Commission, NM Association of Conservation Districts, US Forest Industries, NM Tree Farm Committee, NM Wildlife Federation, NM Department of Game & Fish, USDI Bureau of Indian Affairs, NM State University, Jemez Pueblo and Consulting Foresters.

The Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department does not discriminate against anyone on the basis of race, sex, color, national origin, age or handicap, and is an equal opportunity employer.

You may also be interested in the Tree Farm Program


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